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areas of practice

BIO

Taylor M. Smith IV
ATTORNEY/PARTNER

Taylor Smith concentrates his practice in civil litigation, with a particular emphasis on media and internet speech law, freedom of speech, constitutional/civil rights, freedom of information, appeals, false arrest cases, and criminal defense. Taylor currently is an attorney for the South Carolina Press Association and its 89 member newspapers. 

Taylor’s work has also included representing clients in criminal defense matters, defamation (slander and libel) cases, privacy cases, mortgage foreclosure cases (representing debtors and homeowners as well as creditors and lenders), debt collection matters (representing both creditors and debtors), consumer protection cases, and real estate litigation such as quiet title and partition actions.

Taylor was admitted to the South Carolina Bar in May 2014 and is also admitted to practice before the United States District Court of South Carolina and the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. He graduated from the University of South Carolina in 2008 with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. During pursuit of his undergraduate degree, Taylor wrote for several news publications, including The Gamecock student newspaper and The State newspaper. After graduating, Taylor was a business reporter for the Greenville Journal in Greenville, South Carolina. He returned to Columbia to attend the University of South Carolina School of Law in 2010. During law school, Taylor assisted Harrison & Radeker with Occupy Columbia’s lawsuit against state government and became a law clerk of the firm.

After his admission to the practice of law, Taylor became an associate with the firm in 2014 and shareholder in 2018.

Featured Legal Topic

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Student Speech (First Amendment in Schools)

The U.S. Supreme Court has decided on an important case for the free speech rights of students outside of school grounds. Attorney Taylor Smith of our firm explains how the high court handled a post to Snapchat that not only didn’t disappear but got into the school administrators’ hands.